How Much Should I Feed My Bloodhounds?

i have 2 bloodhounds, each 2 and a half years old, one male one female, the males about 120 lbs and the females about 100 lbs, i think i give them like 7 cups a day…idk i just fill up their bowls, is there a specific amt i should be giving them?
theyre eating it all at once….so 4 cups? ok then

Are they eating that all at once or grazing a little all day?

Being Bloodhounds I am going to guess they eat all that food at once. My Bloodhound would not ever leave a scrap behind.

Its too much food at one time.

The breed is prone to bloat. Its not a question IF they will bloat, but when. Especially the male- since males bloat even more often then females.

You should at least break their feedings into twice a day. You should soak the food for at least an hour before you feed it to them.

Even if you have done the prophylactic bloat surgery you would still follow the above feeding recommendations.

The surgery is usually done at the time of spay/neuter.

Remember its cheaper to have the preventative surgery done then emergency bloat surgery. Where I live emergency bloat surgery currently runs $6,700. My friend just had her dogs surgery a few months ago and that was the cost.

When my Bloodhound bloated back in the early 90′s the cost of surgery was only $3,500.

Better to get the preventative surgery at only about $1,500.

ADD- Here is some information about bloat and bloodhounds, and fesding instructions at the bottom
—————————
Gastric Dilatation Volvulus Syndrome in the Bloodhound
Dr. John Hamil
Of the approximately 1,300,000 dogs registered annually by the AKC only 1500 are bloodhounds. Consequently, most veterinarians will see only a few in their practice lifetime. This brochure is offered by the American Bloodhound Club in an attempt to educate the owners of bloodhounds about the life-threatening nature of this complex syndrome as well as to familiarize veterinarians with some of the peculiarities of our breed and a protocol which has been employed successfully in treating GDV syndrome.

Definition: this is an acute life-threatening condition which initiates complex cardiovascular and metabolic changes that result in high mortality following dilatation and rotation of the stomach on its long axis.

CONCERN: Early recognition of the signs of GDV and immediate veterinary attention will greatly improve survival rate. Only if veterinary care is not accessible should the owner attempt to tube or trocarize the dog, although this may be life saving if you must travel a great distance.

CAUSE: Unkown. Probably multifactorial. No age or sex predilection. The bloodhound’s size, deep chest, frequent ingestion of foreign material, and genetic predisposition make them common victims of this condition. GDV syndrome is seen primarily in large deep chested breeds and, although heritability has not been proven, does seem to be more prevalent in certain lines. This syndrome is often associated with ingestion of large meals and drinking water, post feeding exercise, following general anesthesia, stress (boarding, traveling, showing, breeding, trailing, etc. ) ingestion of foreign bodies, and gastroenteritis with vomition.

SIGNS: The observant owner may notice the early vague signs of restlessness, pacing, lethargy, dull, vacant or painful expression, and/or shallow respiration. Repeated measurements around the abdomen at the level of the last rib with a cloth measuring tape will demonstrate early increases in abdominal size if you are in doubt. Every owner should be able to recognize the more sever signs of unresponsiveness, unproductive retching, salivation, arched back, anterior abdominal pain, abdominal distention, abdominal tenseness, pale mucus membranes (eyes and mouth), weak pulse, blue-gray mucus membranes, weakness, inability to stand, moribund appearance, and, with endotoxic shock, red injected mucus membranes and rapid capillary refill time.

PREVENTION:
Feed 2-4 times daily
Soak dry kibble in hot water for 5-10 minutes prior to feeding
Limit exercise and water consumption for one hour after eating
Prophylactic gastropexy if relatives have been affected (disadvantage in trying to evaluate breeding potential)
Add simethicone to food

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2 Responses to How Much Should I Feed My Bloodhounds?

  1. Amy says:

    3, or 4 bowls a day p.s. dont feed them too much or they will get bloat
    References :

  2. UHave2BeKiddingMe says:

    Are they eating that all at once or grazing a little all day?

    Being Bloodhounds I am going to guess they eat all that food at once. My Bloodhound would not ever leave a scrap behind.

    Its too much food at one time.

    The breed is prone to bloat. Its not a question IF they will bloat, but when. Especially the male- since males bloat even more often then females.

    You should at least break their feedings into twice a day. You should soak the food for at least an hour before you feed it to them.

    Even if you have done the prophylactic bloat surgery you would still follow the above feeding recommendations.

    The surgery is usually done at the time of spay/neuter.

    Remember its cheaper to have the preventative surgery done then emergency bloat surgery. Where I live emergency bloat surgery currently runs $6,700. My friend just had her dogs surgery a few months ago and that was the cost.

    When my Bloodhound bloated back in the early 90′s the cost of surgery was only $3,500.

    Better to get the preventative surgery at only about $1,500.

    ADD- Here is some information about bloat and bloodhounds, and fesding instructions at the bottom
    —————————
    Gastric Dilatation Volvulus Syndrome in the Bloodhound
    Dr. John Hamil
    Of the approximately 1,300,000 dogs registered annually by the AKC only 1500 are bloodhounds. Consequently, most veterinarians will see only a few in their practice lifetime. This brochure is offered by the American Bloodhound Club in an attempt to educate the owners of bloodhounds about the life-threatening nature of this complex syndrome as well as to familiarize veterinarians with some of the peculiarities of our breed and a protocol which has been employed successfully in treating GDV syndrome.

    Definition: this is an acute life-threatening condition which initiates complex cardiovascular and metabolic changes that result in high mortality following dilatation and rotation of the stomach on its long axis.

    CONCERN: Early recognition of the signs of GDV and immediate veterinary attention will greatly improve survival rate. Only if veterinary care is not accessible should the owner attempt to tube or trocarize the dog, although this may be life saving if you must travel a great distance.

    CAUSE: Unkown. Probably multifactorial. No age or sex predilection. The bloodhound’s size, deep chest, frequent ingestion of foreign material, and genetic predisposition make them common victims of this condition. GDV syndrome is seen primarily in large deep chested breeds and, although heritability has not been proven, does seem to be more prevalent in certain lines. This syndrome is often associated with ingestion of large meals and drinking water, post feeding exercise, following general anesthesia, stress (boarding, traveling, showing, breeding, trailing, etc. ) ingestion of foreign bodies, and gastroenteritis with vomition.

    SIGNS: The observant owner may notice the early vague signs of restlessness, pacing, lethargy, dull, vacant or painful expression, and/or shallow respiration. Repeated measurements around the abdomen at the level of the last rib with a cloth measuring tape will demonstrate early increases in abdominal size if you are in doubt. Every owner should be able to recognize the more sever signs of unresponsiveness, unproductive retching, salivation, arched back, anterior abdominal pain, abdominal distention, abdominal tenseness, pale mucus membranes (eyes and mouth), weak pulse, blue-gray mucus membranes, weakness, inability to stand, moribund appearance, and, with endotoxic shock, red injected mucus membranes and rapid capillary refill time.

    PREVENTION:
    Feed 2-4 times daily
    Soak dry kibble in hot water for 5-10 minutes prior to feeding
    Limit exercise and water consumption for one hour after eating
    Prophylactic gastropexy if relatives have been affected (disadvantage in trying to evaluate breeding potential)
    Add simethicone to food
    References :